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With the launch of our 3D Vision® 2 glasses, it was easy to overlook advancements being made on 3D Vision-Ready monitors. Product Manager Michael McSorley walks you through the latest and greatest developments in the display category.  Other than the obvious advantage of an increase in the maximum size for 3D Vision panels—from 24-inches to 27-inches—there are really two primary game-changing features that you should be aware of: 3D LightBoost and...
Just because you don’t have a 3D camera does not have to mean you can’t participate in 3D photography—thanks to companies such as 3Defy, which make software that you can use to transform your 2D images into stereoscopic 3D shots you can view with your 3D Vision™ hardware. The 3Defy name may already be a bit familiar to you if you frequent the site—we’ve been featuring a lot of their content on 3DVisonLive to give you a taste of what...
For the second year NVIDIA is teaming up with Premiers Plans on a 3D short film competition as part of Premiers’ 24th Angers Festival that is taking place now in France. We have created a channel  on 3D Vision Live where you can view two of the six films selected for the official competition in 3D right now.  "Miss Daisy Cutter" is an animated short film by Laen Sanches featuring "Nux Vomica" by The Veils. If Walt Disney took some...
The NVIDIA booth at CES last week in Las Vegas was overflowing with visitors for most of the show. People could get into the Tesla Model S for the first time to play with the incredible 17-inch display in the center of the dash (powered by NVIDIA). And we had two triple-screen 3D racing simulators from VRX running iRacing that drew big lines/crowds. We took along a FujiFilm W3 and snapped some 3D candids throughout the week from the booth, and a few from around the...
It’s been a thrilling first year for 3DVisionLive.com and we’d like to thank all of ours users for helping to make this site one of the most compelling places to visit to view 3D content. During the past year more than 20,000 3D images have been uploaded by 3D enthusiasts for all of us to view, share, and enjoy! As you can imagine, then, selecting a gallery of just 12 images from all of this material for our Best 3D Photos of 2011 gallery was no small feat....

Recent Blog Entries

Amir Hever was driving into a government facility a few years ago when he discovered a huge flaw in their security process. As he approached the entrance gate, a security guard dropped to his knees to look underneath his vehicle.

“When he stood up, I asked him what he was looking for,” said Hever, CEO and co-founder of computer vision startup UVeye. “The security guard answered honestly that he was looking for threats but actually couldn’t see anything. That’s when I realized that something wasn’t working right.”

Hever assembled a team, and began researching the problem and potential solutions. Thus was born in 2016 UVeye, which has since built an under-vehicle inspection system that uses deep learning to bridge the security gap.

Much of the New York-based company’s work centered on grasping the vast variety of vehicle undercarriages, not to mention the changes they undergo after thousands of miles on the road. What Hever and his team learned that it’s not easy to identifying anomalies in vehicle undercarriages.

“We didn’t know what we’re looking for as there is no standard of what a threat would look like in the undercarriage,” said Hever. “Moreover, threats are usually concealed.”

More Than Schematics Needed

UVeye quickly learned that schematics provided by vehicle manufacturers aren’t enough because, after thousands of miles of road time, undercarriages don’t look like they did when they came off the assembly line. The answer was to develop an algorithm for unsupervised learning that would make it possible to spot threats — no matter how well concealed or the condition of the vehicle’s undercarriage.

The company rented hundreds of vehicles in various conditions and scanned their undercarriages, generating both 2D images and 3D models. That data was fed into its deep learning model, which maps the location of all the parts (segmentation) and then analyzes each segment separately and looks for anomalies.

This allows it to detect any alterations or anomalies to those parts, or the presence of foreign objects as small as USB drives. It can also tell whether a chunk of snow or mud looks natural, or if it might be a disguise used to conceal something.

UVeye uses workstations running multiple NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 GPUs to train its models. It turns to cloud-based GPUs running on Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure to train beyond its workstations’ capabilities, or to speed up the process further.

Hever said the use of GPUs, as well as the CUDA parallel computing model, significantly sped up the company’s training and development processes, as well as the system’s ability to generate results.

UVeye’s first line of products enables customers to automatically scan, detect and identify anomalies, modifications or foreign objects in the undercarriage of any vehicle. The company has already installed its system — packaged as a piece of hardware that sits in the ground, scanning vehicles that pass over it — at more than 30 sites worldwide. This has provided abundant test data verifying the system’s effectiveness.

“Our machine learning algorithm detects anomalies in any vehicle whilst in motion, within three seconds,” said Hever. “GPUs are making it possible.”

Inspection as a Service

Today, UVeye is revolutionizing vehicle inspection for the automotive industry. Additional applications for its system focus on security, with homeland security representing a robust market for the company’s technology.

“The need for an automatic external inspection system for vehicles that can detect anomalies, changes and dents, and also track changes over time, is huge,” Hever said.

The company has also leveraged its algorithms to analyze other parts of vehicles besides undercarriages and to inspect any vehicle from all sides.

“UVeye’s 360-degree system can detect vehicle leaks, wear and tear, and a wide variety of mechanical problems or damages,” Hever said.

From auto sales and rentals to fleet management and maintenance, Hever sees infinite opportunities for his company’s Inspection-as-a-Service model to ensure safe and reliable operation of vehicles.

Said Hever, “We are going to change the way that people and organizations inspect their cars.”

The post Computer Vision Startup Plugs Critical Security Hole in Vehicle Inspection appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.

There was no escaping the automotive innovations, or the camera-toting crowds gawking at them, at CES 2018 this week in Las Vegas.

NVIDIA kicked off the show with a torrent of new partnerships and autonomous driving solutions. Uber, Volkswagen, Aurora, ZF, Baidu and Mercedes-Benz all announced new initiatives with NVIDIA. The announcements brought the total number of partners developing on the NVIDIA DRIVE platform to more than 320.

Around the North Hall, attendees at the world’s largest trade show could find our partners at almost every turn. Starting at the NVIDIA booth, Roborace drew crowds — and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao — with the CES debut of its low-set, sinuous Robocar. The NVIDIA-powered electric race car will take part in a future autonomous series, sanctioned by Formula E.

Nearby in the NVIDIA Holodeck, visitors took a virtual bus trip through time. After donning head-mounted displays they got to experience the transformation of the iconic 1960s era Volkswagen Type 2 microbus into the AI-infused, all-electric VW I.D. Buzz slated for 2022. Holodeck is a VR lab that lets far-flung teams come together in a realistic virtual environment to interact with photorealistic models of their designs.

For attendees interested in seeing self-driving go big in the most literal sense, TuSimple displayed an autonomous Peterbilt truck with NVIDIA DRIVE technology. The company provides a camera- and radar-based technology for autonomous driving. The startup expects to begin commercial operation of their level 4 system — supervised by test drivers — this year.

While NVIDIA has worked with both ZF and Baidu for over a year, a new initiative announced at CES brings the three companies together to realize a commercial solution for autonomous valet parking this year, with production vehicles using AI self-driving technologies expected on the roads of China starting in 2020.

Amid stunning visuals at the Mercedes-Benz booth, the automaker unveiled the NVIDIA-powered MBUX infotainment system. This revolutionary in-cabin experience can learn and adapt to driver and passenger preferences, thanks to artificial intelligence.

Dozens of other NVIDIA DRIVE partners attended the event to share their latest work with the crowds who descended on Las Vegas for the week. We spent time with many of them on the show floor, including Tertavue, Expolorer.ai, Cepton, Navya, HERE, AutonomouStuff, Deepmap, Innoviz, Cognata, Adasky and Torc. Watch our partner recap video above to hear about the latest self-driving innovations.

Take an even deeper dive into the technology at the heart of the autonomous vehicle revolution. Join us in March for the GPU Technology Conference in Silicon Valley.

The post Automotive Innovations Powered by NVIDIA DRIVE Draw Crowds at CES 2018 appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.