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You upgrade your drivers regularly, right? We hope so, because we put a lot of effort into improving the peformance of our hardware with the hottest games and if you do not update your display drivers you may be missing out. Case in point: World of Tanks. Not only has this multiplayer online game received a major content update recently, updating the game to version 7.3, which included several new tanks in the Soviet line as well as new maps and various game fixes. The...
Everyone with kids knows that when school's out our kids suddenly have lots of free time—while most parents, unfortunately, do not—and we hear around the house "I'm bored." Well, you can't spend every day at the pool, so why not put your 3D Vision PC to use and let your kids enjoy some family-friendly 3D games, such as these! One word of warning though: you might have a hard time getting those glasses back….    Cars 2: The Video Game Inspired by the Disney...
Crack those knuckles, limber up, and get ready for chills—Capcom’s Street Fighter X Tekken and Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City are available now for PC, and both are excellent 3D titles right out of the gate. Capcom’s been a very strong 3D partner for NVIDIA, releasing several big titles with excellent 3D support over the years—including previous games in the Resident Evil and Street Fighter series—resulting in the best-possible 3D Vision gaming experience. Tekken and...
It’s taken a while to cull through all the great entries we had for the March Photo Contest – thanks to all who submitted images. We’ve been treated to a wide array of distinctive and inventive 3D photographs during the last month! Without further ado, the winner of March’s contest is LudvikXIV for his submission of “Trojan Warrior IV”. Not only is this image incredibly creative, but the contrast of stylized background and the Trojan...
We’ve unlocked the capability on 3DVisionLive.com for anyone to upload their own 3D videos—previously you had to have your own channel and/or have your videos screened and approved by NVIDIA to upload them. We’re excited about this, and we hope you are too, as it will open the site to great deal of new content and, hopefully, community participation—both in terms of uploading videos and sharing and commenting on them. NOTE: We have added the ability...

Recent Blog Entries

School is the last place most kids want to be over the summer. But then, most summer school classes don’t involve building race cars. And they especially don’t involve autonomous race cars.

Yet that’s exactly what nearly 40 high schoolers did at MIT’s Beaver Works Summer Institute. Leaving the swimming and s’mores to their classmates, these students pursued a bigger adventure — learning about self-driving car technologies.

In four-week program sponsored by NVIDIA, the students soaked up knowledge about topics like object detection, mapping and localization from leading lights at MIT, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Harvard University.

They broke into nine teams to engineer their own autonomous mini-hotrods powered by NVIDIA Jetson TX1 embedded supercomputers. They closed the program by racing them in the MIT Mini Grand Prix.

Teens watched their self-driving cars race around the track in MIT’s Mini Grand Prix. Image courtesy of MIT. Students Who Love Tech

Maryam Ahmad, a 17 year old from New Hampshire, was a member of the Crazy Eights team, which swept the Grand Prix by winning in all three categories: speed, innovation and “most flair.”

Although Ahmad has a longstanding interest in biology, “this really unleashed my interest in robotics,” she said. But the learning went beyond expanding her science horizons. “Every day, I gained new technical and communications skills, and every day I became a better teammate,” she said.

Sixteen-year-old Syed Hassan of New York has a long-time interest in technology, especially robotics, and the MIT program only amplified that. “You can have robots do everyday tasks so you can put time and attention into things that matter more,” he said.

Self-Driving Car Class Boosts Student Prospects

Students came to the MIT autonomous car class from across the country — 13 states and Puerto Rico. To be eligible, they had to take a self-paced online course during their spring semester to beef up their skills in areas like computer vision and Python programming, which they’d need for the fast-paced summer session. The best students got to attend the free program at MIT. Another 20 students participated in a similar class remotely.

“In many high schools, there are strong computer science programs that focus on abstract concepts, or robotics classes that only focus on hardware,” said Sertac Karaman, an MIT professor of aeronautics and astronautics who helped run the program.

Karaman said he aims to complement the students’ high school studies.

“The hope is that when we look back at their careers in 10-20 years, they’ll be doing wonderful things,” he said. “Learning to be part of a team and to be entrepreneurial will create a positive impact in their lives beyond high school.”

Students ready for a chance to race their miniature self-driving cars during the MIT Beaver Works summer program. Image courtesy of MIT.

The post Teens Build, Race Miniature Self-Driving Cars at MIT Summer Program appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.

Highlighting the growing ties between NVIDIA and researchers at elite universities, NVIDIA founder and CEO Jensen Huang spoke to a gathering of AI researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Wednesday.

The talk kicked off BAIR NVIDIA AI Day at UC Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium, which brought together researchers from the university and the company for talks and demos.

“You here at UC Berkeley are at the intersection of artificial intelligence, computer science and autonomous machines,” Jensen, clad in his trademark black leather jacket, told more than 400 students, faculty and researchers. “Really, it can’t get any better than that.”

The event is the latest example of the close ties between NVIDIA and elite researchers who are using deep learning to advance robotics, autonomous vehicles and computer vision. (See “Deep Learning Pioneers Boost AI Research at NVIDIA AI Labs Around the World.”)

From 3D Graphics to AI

In his talk, Jensen explained how NVIDIA found its way to the center of the AI revolution that has upended computing.

NVIDIA, Jensen explained, began as a bet that on demand for 3D graphics and gaming. To whet the appetite for more sophisticated 3D experiences, NVIDIA invented the programmable shader. And to unlock the computing power of the shaders built into every GPU, NVIDIA invented CUDA.

NVIDIA founder and CEO Jensen Huang spoke to a gathering of AI researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Wednesday.

CUDA, in turn, gave researchers the tool they needed to unleash the parallel computing power of GPUs, turning the vast quantities of data generated by the internet, and a new generation of neural network models, into the deep learning technology that powers services now relied on by hundreds of millions of people every day.

And — thanks to a new generation of researchers armed with AI computing platforms from NVIDIA — more is coming.

Work that used to take a decade to commercialize now finds it way to market in six months, explained Trevor Darrell, a professor in UC Berkeley’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

“The time between research innovation and the impact on the marketplace has been reduced by an order of magnitude,” Darrell said. “We’re seeing industry partners more excited to support fundamental research.”

Self-Driving Cars, Robots that Learn, and More

The talks from UC Berkeley and NVIDIA researchers highlighted the close ties between researchers in academia and at NVIDIA.

One of day’s highlights: UC Berkeley Assistant Professor Sergey Levine, who explained how he and his team of researchers are developing new deep learning techniques that are giving robots the ability to observe an action, imagine how they can duplicate that action, and then judge how their own actions compare to the mental model they’ve created.

Complementing Levine’s talk, Bryan Catanzaro, NVIDIA’s vice president of applied deep learning research, spoke about how his team is putting deep learning techniques pioneered in academia to work in areas at NVIDIA as diverse as semiconductor design and virtual world design.

“NVIDIA uses AI in every aspect of its work,” said Catanzaro, who earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley. “AI is proliferating in new and unexpected places.”

Other speakers included Darrell, who spoke on using deep learning to help machines reason and explore; UC Berkeley Professor Pieter Abbeel, who talked about deep reinforcement learning and meta learning; and NVIDIA’s Larry Jackel, a veteran of Bell Labs who explained how NVIDIA’s work on self-driving vehicles builds on decades of neural network research.

I Am AI, Literally

After the talks, students and researchers gathered to network over wine and appetizers, gawk at demos of how deep learning is being put to work, and talk about what they’d heard.

Computer science student Humza Iqbal says he thinks deep learning will continue to surprise the wider world, particularly in computer security.

Guy Isely, a Ph.D. student in neuroscience, said he thinks people will be surprised by how common robots could become in five to 10 years.

Others, such as Esmond Ai, a student at Berkeley’s Haas school of business — just across the street from the event’s venue — see deep learning opening up vast new opportunities for entrepreneurs.

Ai said he was inspired by an entrepreneurial tale Jensen shared with students — and the “I am AI” t-shirts worn by NVIDIANs at the event.

“‘I am AI’ makes a lot of sense to me,” Ai said with a grin. “I guess you could say I saw those shirts and was drawn in.”

The post NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang Kicks Off Berkeley AI Event appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.