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If you’ve a penchant for liking superhero-themed anything and playing games in 3D, the Batman: Arkham series has been a match made in heaven. Simply put, when it comes to 3D Vision titles it just doesn’t get much better – and it’s hard to see how it could.We’re happy to report that Batman: Arkham Origins, which releases today, continues this tradition. Out of the box, Origins is rated 3D Vision Ready, so you know it’s going to look spectacular. We’ve played it quite a bit...
Contest closed - stay tuned to 3DVisionlive.com for details about upcoming contests.     3DVisionLive.com is excited to unveil the latest in a series of photo contests aimed at giving you a platform to show off your images and potentially win some cool prizes. Like our most recent Spring Contest, this one will span three months - October, November, and December - and is themed: Your image must be something that captures or shows the essence of "nature" and what...
With sincere apologies for the delay, NVIDIA is pleased to announce the results of the Spring Photo Contest. We received more than 80 submissions from 3DVisionLive members and, for the first time, invited the membership to select the winner. The only criteria for the contest was the photos had to represent the meaning of Spring in some fashion, and be an original image created by the member that submitted it. All submitted photos were put in a gallery and ample time was...
For the third year in a row, NVIDIA worked with the National Stereoscopic Association to sponsor a 3D digital image competition called the Digital Image Showcase, which is shown at the NSA convention - held this past June in Michigan. This year, the 3D Digital Image Showcase competition consisted of 294 images, submitted by 50 different makers. Entrants spanned the range from casual snapshooters to both commercial and fine art photographers. The competition was judged by...
  VOTING IS NOW CLOSED - Thanks to all that participated. Results coming soon!   The submission period for the Spring Photo Contest is now closed, and we are happy to report we’ve received 80 images from our members for consideration. And, for the first time, we’re opening the judging process to our community as well to help us determine the winners. So, between now and the end of June (11:59 PST, June 30st), please view all of the images in the gallery and place...

Recent Blog Entries

How do you find the perfect balance of art, story, and software? Ask Danny Lange, Unity Technologies’ VP of AI and Machine Learning.

While other industries were quick to adopt AI, the gaming world has been slow to integrate machine learning systems. At Unity, Lange is leading efforts to change that.

According to Lange, the gaming industry is hesitant to use deep learning in the game-making process because of the role of art involved in creating games.

“You really want to control your storyline, you really want to make sure your audience, your players, are having a top-rated experience, and you don’t really want to leave that up to the computer to decide,” Lange said in a conversation with Michael Copeland, host of the AI Podcast.

But Lange believes AI can help game makers by adding more automation in games.

“I think a lot of information systems have really improved over the years by getting AI and machine learning in their implementation,” said Lange. “And I personally believe that we can bring that to game development as well and basically improve the productivity of the game developers by taking away some of the more trivial tasks.”

Such trivial tasks include the creation of non-player characters (NPCs). With AI, NPCs can learn behaviors overnight, freeing up more time for developers to focus on other aspects of the game.

While the implementation of AI will alter the way we develop and play our games, one thing that can’t change is the creativity that goes into the game narrative.

“The game creator is in control of the game and it needs be entertaining, and it needs to be amusing, and create enjoyment for the player,” said Lange. “So, the NPCs should not take over here, they should be a tool to create that storyline that is exciting.”

AI Podcast: The Robo-Wolf on Wall Street

And if you missed last week’s episode, Guarav Chakravorty, founder of online advisory firm qplum, shared how his company is using an AI robo-advisor to help us make better investments.

How to Tune in to the AI Podcast

The AI Podcast is available through iTunes, DoggCatcher, Google Play Music, Overcast, PlayerFM, Podbay, Pocket Casts, PodCruncher, PodKicker, Stitcher and Soundcloud. If your favorite isn’t listed here, email us at aipodcast@nvidia.com.

 

The post AI Podcast: How Unity’s Danny Lange Hopes to Bring AI to Gaming appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.

Mark Chung’s unexpectedly high $500 monthly electric bill zapped his curiosity.

So when his Silicon Valley utility couldn’t explain it — despite “smart meters” installed throughout its system — he took matters into his own hands.

The Stanford-trained electrical engineer hacked some inexpensive meters from his local hardware store to be wi-fi enabled, and then built an electrical map of his home.

They showed that a small failure in his pool pump was causing a massive current overload, which couldn’t have been detected with traditional tools. More importantly, he learned how hard it is to get information from buildings, which typically lack any kind of computerized management.

Verdigris Smart Sensor

Thus was born the idea for Verdigris, a startup that wants to help conserve energy in buildings using GPU-powered artificial intelligence.

And it’s a large problem.

Buildings gobble up about 70 percent of the world’s electricity — and waste 60 percent of it. That’s $100 billion wasted on electricity each year — and a chance to cut an estimated 15 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

To address the issue, Verdigris clamps proprietary wireless sensors onto electrical mains, panels and circuits. While most buildings get occasional walk-through energy usage audits, Verdigris’ digital system uploads electricity consumption data to the cloud 24/7.

From there, it can sell the raw data to building managers or apply its own AI algorithms and provide insights it gleans. It can even integrate the data with building management systems to automate electricity usage controls.

By forecasting problems and identifying areas for optimization and automation, Chung, who serves as Verdigris’s CEO, says the firm can help facilities get more done. Hotel managers, for example, could detect and fix building issues before guests even notice them.

All this wouldn’t be possible without the plummeting costs of bandwidth, sensors, data collection, processing and storage that have fueled AI’s growth.

The Verdigris tracker is a mobile web app for real-time event tracking and notification and anomaly detection.

“AI is extending into every facet of our lives: how we travel, how we produce food, how we work, how we live,” Chung said. “Smart buildings are one of the most valuable and largest opportunities for this trend.”

It didn’t take long for Chung to realize this insight could help other homeowners as well as large buildings. (In fact, NVIDIA is exploring how it can use Verdigris’ technology to reduce electrical consumption on its Silicon Valley campus.)

Verdigris’ trains its models on Pascal architecture-based NVIDIA GPUs. Chung estimates this helps Verdigris  train models 20 times as fast as on CPUs. He expects the role of GPU acceleration will grow as the company moves into circuit classification and other problems that will benefit from convolutional neural networks.

From Smart Buildings to Smart Cities

In the meantime, the company is applying its technology to reduce carbon footprints by increasing energy efficiency. Eventually, Chung said he’d like Verdigris to expand beyond smart building optimization and into enabling smart cities.

“If there is a large disaster, you could responsively adjust the city to shut down everything except central services and redirect energy to best support people,” Chung said.

The work won’t be done, Chung said, “until we have an automated planet.”

The post How a $500 Electric Bill Jolted an AI Startup Into Focusing on Energy Conservation appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.