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3D News

For the last few years we’ve worked with the National Stereoscopic Association to support the 3D Digital Showcase photo competition featured at the NSA’s annual conventions. The images from this past year’s showcase are now live for everyone to view. We really enjoy the diversity of images submitted by 3D artists and enthusiasts to this event, and this gallery is certainly no different. You’ll see everything from close ups of insects to people juggling fire. Simply put,...
In driver 334.89 NVIDIA introduced a new proprietary rendering mode for 3D Vision that enables us to improve the 3D experience for many key DirectX 10 and 11 games. This mode is now called “3D Compatibility Mode”. We have continued to iterate on this feature in driver 344.11, increasing game support and adding some new interface elements. You can get the new driver at www.geforce.com/drivers or via the update option in Geforce Experience. With the release of 344.11, new 3D...
We’re fortunate enough to have another fine 3D video from New Media Film Festival to share with you here on 3DVisionLive—a pop music video from Italy called “The Way,” which you can view here. Even better, New Media Film Festival has provided an interview with one of the co-directors of the video, Edoardo Ballanti, which provides insights on how the video was created and the vision behind it. Enjoy! (Alice Corsi also co-directed the video.) What was the Inspiration behind “...
The Fall Photo Contest received nearly 100 images – thanks to all that entered! The contest called for your best “nature” shots with the only other requirement being that they had to be true stereo images. Submissions ranged from shots of spiders in gardens to artistic approaches to tasteful nudes. As before, members were invited to vote for the winner by tagging images in the contest gallery as favorites. Without further ado, the winner is: Autumn Goodbye to Summer This...
In driver 334.89 NVIDIA introduced a new proprietary rendering mode for 3D Vision that enables us to improve the 3D experience for many key DirectX 10 and 11 games. This mode is now called “3D Compatibility Mode”. We have continued to iterate on this feature in beta driver 337, increasing game support and adding a toggle key to enable/disable the mode. Games with 3D Compatibility Mode will launch in this mode by default. To change the render mode back to standard 3D Vision...

Recent Blog Entries

Tracking endangered birds used to mean sending teams of biologists to scramble around remote islands and craggy cliffs to peer down burrows with special optical fiber optic scopes.

Not only was that difficult and dangerous, it was inefficient. Even the best supplied expedition can only spend a week or two in the field.

Not any more.

Now, thanks to deep learning, biologists can alight on remote islands with just a dozen sensors, leave, and return months later to scoop up vast quantities of data.

The data — far more than any one human can analyze — is then crunched by deep learning systems developed by Conservation Metrics, based in Santa Cruz, Calif., and trained with NVIDIA GPUs.

The results are uncanny. Biologists can now use sensitive microphones track how often endangered birds run into obstacles over many months. They’ve even used the technology to find — and protect — birds that were once thought extinct.

“Deep learning has allowed us to move from projects that include five sensors deployed for a month to 150 sensors deployed for six to eight months,” Matthew McKown, CEO of Conservation Metrics, said in a conversation with tech journalist Michael Copeland in the latest episode of our AI Podcast. “That allows us to track really rare events, and get a better conservation outcome.”

To hear the full story — and the tale of how deep learning helped rediscover, and protect, a rare species of kestrel on a remote island in the Pacific, tune into the latest edition of the AI Podcast.

AI Podcast: How AI Can Improve Brain Tumor Treatment

And if you missed our podcast last week, it’s worth a listen: we spoke with Dr. Bradley Erickson, a Mayo Clinic neuroradiologist, who uses AI to predict tumor genomics using MRIs. His method could give doctors easier access to invaluable genetic information. Information that could predict how fast a tumor will progress, and if it will respond to specific drugs and other treatments.

The post The AI Podcast: AI Takes Wing – Deep Learning Hears Once Extinct Bird appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.

Superior Street is one of Duluth, Minnesota’s oldest and most iconic streets, home to family businesses, shops and cafes.

Superior Street today in downtown Duluth, Minnesota.

Now virtual reality is helping with a long awaited revitalization project thanks to the work of LHB, a local architecture, engineering and planning firm.

Everyone from Minnesota’s lieutenant governor to the general public is interested in Superior Street’s redevelopment. Key to gaining support for the project was how LHB used VR to provide an immersive, realistic rendering that displayed the aesthetics, lighting, ambience and sightlines.

For many, it’s difficult to visualize how the final project will appear in real life when viewing 2D drawings of the design. The ability to experience the scene in a real scale from every viewpoint using VR made for far better informed decision making.

Superior Street revitalized as rendered in VR.

VR also helped streamline the design review process and control costs because potential design issues were spotted before construction started.

For LHB, delivering a high-quality VR experience began by generating designs in high-end design and modeling applications. They used topography information from AutoCAD Civil 3D and modeled details such as curbs and utilities with Autodesk Revit.

To create realistic nighttime views, streetlamps and other light sources were photometrically accurate for the lamp and bulb type — all with the help of NVIDIA Quadro GPUs. The data was rendered in real time using VR applications such as Revizto, and then all came together in Fuzor, a turnkey VR platform for the AEC industry.

The Tech Behind the Turnaround

Running Fuzor with NVIDIA Quadro GPUs offers unique benefits, such as access to NVIDIA VRWorks enabled VR SLI. With VR SLI, dual Quadro GPUs can render one eye each — dramatically accelerating performance and resulting in a smoother VR experience.

It all adds up to LHB creating a more compelling experience much earlier than with traditional design tools.

“Traditional fixed-angle renderings still have their place, but having VR allows our clients to freely explore projects in progress. This forces us to consider materials and other design elements earlier in the process so the VR experience is realistic. This also allows the client to make more informed decisions earlier,” says Dan Stine, BIM administrator for LHB.

“The payoff is client buy-in and spotting potential issues before starting construction, and that’s invaluable,” Stine says.

Read the full case study.

The post How VR Is Helping Revitalize Downtown Duluth appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.