Skip to main content

3D News

For the last few years we’ve worked with the National Stereoscopic Association to support the 3D Digital Showcase photo competition featured at the NSA’s annual conventions. The images from this past year’s showcase are now live for everyone to view. We really enjoy the diversity of images submitted by 3D artists and enthusiasts to this event, and this gallery is certainly no different. You’ll see everything from close ups of insects to people juggling fire. Simply put,...
In driver 334.89 NVIDIA introduced a new proprietary rendering mode for 3D Vision that enables us to improve the 3D experience for many key DirectX 10 and 11 games. This mode is now called “3D Compatibility Mode”. We have continued to iterate on this feature in driver 344.11, increasing game support and adding some new interface elements. You can get the new driver at www.geforce.com/drivers or via the update option in Geforce Experience. With the release of 344.11, new 3D...
We’re fortunate enough to have another fine 3D video from New Media Film Festival to share with you here on 3DVisionLive—a pop music video from Italy called “The Way,” which you can view here. Even better, New Media Film Festival has provided an interview with one of the co-directors of the video, Edoardo Ballanti, which provides insights on how the video was created and the vision behind it. Enjoy! (Alice Corsi also co-directed the video.) What was the Inspiration behind “...
The Fall Photo Contest received nearly 100 images – thanks to all that entered! The contest called for your best “nature” shots with the only other requirement being that they had to be true stereo images. Submissions ranged from shots of spiders in gardens to artistic approaches to tasteful nudes. As before, members were invited to vote for the winner by tagging images in the contest gallery as favorites. Without further ado, the winner is: Autumn Goodbye to Summer This...
In driver 334.89 NVIDIA introduced a new proprietary rendering mode for 3D Vision that enables us to improve the 3D experience for many key DirectX 10 and 11 games. This mode is now called “3D Compatibility Mode”. We have continued to iterate on this feature in beta driver 337, increasing game support and adding a toggle key to enable/disable the mode. Games with 3D Compatibility Mode will launch in this mode by default. To change the render mode back to standard 3D Vision...

Recent Blog Entries

We’ll know AI really works when we hardly notice it at all, according to Bryan Catanzaro, a key figure in the field.

“AI gets better and better until it kind of disappears into the background,” says Catanzaro — NVIDIA’s head of applied deep learning research — in conversation with host Michael Copeland on this week’s edition of the new AI Podcast. “Once you stop noticing that it’s there because it works so well — that’s when it’s really landed.”

Bryan’s been in AI since the beginning. Or, as Michael says, as “about as long as it has really worked.” It’s a journey that’s taken him from UC Berkeley, where he earned his Ph.D., to NVIDIA, to Baidu — where he worked on a team that’s made a number of deep learning breakthroughs — and back to NVIDIA.

Along the way, he’s seen deep learning make incredible advances. It’s much further along than he would have predicted five years ago, he says. Image recognition has been one major success, with sophisticated facial recognition capabilities built into photo sharing services used by hundreds of millions of people every day.

“We’re at a point now where computers are actually better at recognizing objects in images than a person is,” Bryan says.

More’s coming, he explains. Deep learning — powered by ever more powerful GPUs — only grows more useful as the amount of data in the world grows.

“There’s a great number of problems that can be framed in this way, where you have a huge number of labeled examples, and you want a system to learn what that input means,” Bryan says.

To hear the whole conversation, tune into this week’s AI Podcast.

And if you missed our podcast last week, it’s definitely worth a listen: NVIDIA’s Will Ramey, a gifted explainer of all things deep learning, provides a clear explanation of the key concepts driving the field forward.

Finally, don’t miss next week’s podcast, where we talk about how you can use deep learning to accomplish some surprising do-it-yourself projects.

The post AI Podcast: Where Is Deep Learning Going Next? appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.

A team from the Massachusetts General Hospital was among the researchers talking about how they’re using AI at GTC DC earlier this year.

The Mass General researchers joined colleagues from across the healthcare industry to help tell the story of how deep-learning – which is already used by hundreds of millions of people on smartphones – can improve health care.

Mass General became the first medical institute in the world — and among the first five research institutions of any kind — to receive an NVIDIA DGX-1. We delivered the supercomputer at Mass General’s historic Ether Dome, where the first public demonstration of surgery using anesthetic took place in 1846.

Mass General’s Clinical Data Science Center joins other early DGX-1 users, including the Open AI Institute, the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, benevolent.ai, SAP and the Berkeley Artificial Intelligence Research Lab.

The center is already using GPUs to make significant medical advances. Researchers are testing an automated bone-age analyzer they’ve created that speeds diagnosis of children’s growth problems and is nearly as accurate as human radiologists (see “Deep Learning Speeds Diagnosis of Kids’ Growth Problems”).

More is coming. The Clinical Data Science Center is using AI and deep learning to advance healthcare, beginning with radiology, pathology and genetics. The center will research, test and implement new ways to improve the detection, diagnosis, treatment and management of diseases by training a deep neural network using Mass General’s vast stores of phenotypic, genetics and imaging data. The hospital has a database containing 10 billion medical images.

We delivered the supercomputer at Mass General’s historic Ether Dome, where the first public demonstration of surgery using anesthetic took place in 1846.

“The intent is to be able to explore the integration of man and machine at this point of clinical care, taking some of the data historically and using that data to actually create information in the machine so that we can see into the future what’s happening with patients before the human has the idea that there are changes taking place,” said Dr. Keith Dreyer, vice chairman and associate professor of radiology at Mass General and Harvard Medical School and executive director of the Mass General Clinical Data Science Center.

Radiology and Medical Imaging

DGX-1 also promises to help accelerate the adoption of AI in fields where machine learning techniques have already made a difference, such as radiology and medical imaging.

“The importance of machine learning and machine learning for radiology is unquestioned,” said Dr. James Brink, head of radiology at Mass General and chair of the American College of Radiologists. “I think there’s an enormous amount of opportunity for us to improve the efficiency of our work and the accuracy of our work through automation and semi-automation.”

Work with Patients

Longer term, deep learning also promises to help deliver better care for today’s patients by letting doctors better use the flood of medical research and patient data being produced by Mass General and other medical centers.

“I see deep learning and other machine learning techniques that could help us on a day-to-day basis make the process more efficient and in essence even more accurate,” said Dr. Long Li, assistant in pathology at Mass General and an assistant professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School.

Sounds like just what the doctor ordered.

Learn more about the DGX-1. Questions? Request a call.

The post Man, Machine and Medicine: Mass General Researchers Using AI appeared first on The Official NVIDIA Blog.